Articles Posted in Injunctive Relief

Most agreements not to compete provide for injunctive relief as the primary remedy against a departing employee who joins a competitor.  In some cases, however, companies will condition the payment of post-employment or deferred compensation on the employee’s compliance with a noncompete agreement.  These arrangements are often referred to as the “employee choice” doctrine. Under this doctrine, an employee who departs and subsequently violates his noncompete obligations will forfeit any right to the post-employment compensation. The doctrine is based on the premise that a departing employee is given the choice of either preserving his right to compensation by refraining from engaging in competitive activities, or forfeiting that right by choosing to compete with the former employer.

Although Delaware courts have not specifically addressed this doctrine, a recent New York decision applying Delaware law applied the doctrine and refused to grant the former employer’s request for injunctive relief. In NBTY, Inc. v. O’Connell Vigliantethe plaintiff NBTY was a vitamin and nutritional product distributor. Beginning in 2014, a number of NBTY employees resigned and went to work at Piping Rock Health Products, LLC – a competitor run by NBTY’s former CEO. All of the departing NBTY employees had signed stock-option agreements with NBTY’s parent which allowed them to purchase stock options over a period of time, and the agreements contained restrictive covenants prohibiting them from competing with NBTY for a one-year period following the end of their employment. Notably, the agreements all contained Delaware choice of law provisions.

After the employees resigned and went to Piping Rock, NBTY sued to enforce the non-compete agreements and sought to permanently enjoin the employees from working at Piping Rock. The defendants moved to dismiss the complaint, arguing that they had not exercised any of the stock options in question and thus there was no consideration.

Covenants not to compete, or noncompete agreemenoncompetents, can play a key role in helping a business entity protect its confidential information,  prevent unfair competition and the raiding of its workforce.  A poorly drafted agreement, however, can leave the business exposed to claims that the covenants are not enforceable, which in turn can lead to unnecessary litigation. Below are a number of common components that make up a well-drafted non-competition agreement.

Define the Parties

The parties should always be identified as one of the first terms in the agreement. The drafting attorney should make sure that all corporate entities which have an interest in the protections afforded by the agreement are included. This is especially important where there are parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

A recent survey conducted by several of my colleagues demonstrates the speed in which litigants can obtain preliminary relief from the Court of Chancery. The survey included a sampling and analysis of approximately 200 cases between 2009 and 2011, in which the court ruled upon a motion for temporary restraining order or a motion for preliminary injunction. The results reflect the frequency and speed at which the court has granted injunctive relief in recent years:

  • For cases in which the court ruled on a motion for temporary restraining order, the court granted the motion 58 percent of the time. On average, the court granted the motion 7 days after its filing.
  • For cases in which the court ruled on a motion for preliminary injunction, the court granted the motion 30 percent of the time. On average, the court granted the motion 26 days after its filing.
  • The survey also looked at cases from the sample that involved trade secret claims and in which the court ruled on a motion for temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction. In those cases, the court granted the motion for temporary restraining order 88 percent of the time and granted the motion for preliminary injunction 75 percent of the time.

Based on these statistics, there seems to be little doubt that the court will order injunctive relief on an expedited basis in cases where circumstances require expedition, including those involving noncompete agreements and misappropriation of trade secret.

A copy of the full article drafted by my colleagues and published by BNA can be obtained on the Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor website.

One of the most critical points in the enforcement of a noncompete is when a company first learns that a former employee may be engaging in unfair competition.  Indeed, the steps taken by the company in the first few days can often determine whether it will be successful in limiting the amount of harm done.

In many case, the company will act quickly and seek emergency injunctive relief to stop imminent irreparable harm to its business.  In other cases, the company may try to resolve the dispute with the competitor by engaging in settlement discussions at the outset.  The benefit of the latter strategy, of course, is that a business resolution is often preferable to the expense and uncertainty of litigation. 

But companies that chose the settlement route need to be aware that the passage of time can compromise their ability to get relief from a court should discussions break down, particularly if it needs an emergency injunction.  In a recent Chancery Court hearing on an application for a temporary restraining order, the court was quick to point out plaintiff’s apparent four month delay after learning of the defendants activities before seeking the TRO.  The plaintiff responded that the delay was due in part to its efforts to work out a standstill agreement with the defendants.  As noted in the transcript excerpt below, the court was not sympathetic to this argument:

Employers frequently confront the problem of theft or misappropriation of trade secrets and confidential, proprietary information by departing employees. While employers have an arsenal of legal weapons at their disposal to protect their most valuable business assets, it is critical that they take proactive steps to protect against the disclosure of important business information and prevent unfair competition. From a practical standpoint, failure to implement basic security measures makes it easier for an unethical employee or competitor to misappropriate confidential business information. From a legal perspective, absent efforts to preserve the secrecy of such information and avoid unfair competition, a court is unlikely to respond favorably to an employer request for relief.youngconaway

Trade Secret Protection

Delaware, like most states, has enacted the “Uniform Trade Secrets Act” providing employers with legal protection for trade secret information even in the absence of contractual agreements with employees. While many people may believe that “trade secret” status is only afforded to scientific data such as the formula for Coke, in reality, trade secret protection is available for a much broader array of information. The statutory definition for a trade secret is “information” that “derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to, and not being readily ascertainable by proper means, by other persons who can obtain economic value from its disclosure or use.” To be protected by the statute, the information must be “the subject of efforts that are reasonable under the circumstances to maintain its secrecy.”

The Delaware Court of Chancery is nationally respected for its consistent and conscientious decisions in cases involving complex business issues. As a result, many legal practitioners recommend that contracting parties include a forum selection clause requiring that any disputes arising from a given contract be heard by a court of competent jurisdiction in the State of Delaware, including the Court of Chancery. A recent case in the Delaware Court of Chancery provides insight into the effective enforcement of a forum-selection clause.youngconaway

In the daintily-named case of ASDC Holdings, LLC v. The Richard J. Malouf 2008 All Smiles Grantor Retained Annuity Trust, two parties entered into an agreement regarding the sale of equity in a Texas business. The agreement contained both an arbitration and a Delaware forum-selection clause which provided that any actions “with respect to any claim or cause of action arising under or relating to this Agreement” must be brought in a Delaware state or federal court with jurisdiction.

After the deal was executed, both parties became unhappy and sought legal relief: Plaintiff initiated an arbitration proceeding, and Defendant brought suit in a Texas court. Plaintiff thereafter filed papers in the Delaware Court of Chancery, seeking a preliminary injunction to prohibit the Texas action from moving forward in violation of the forum-selection clause.

While the Court of Chancery will frequently enjoin parties from engaging in unfair competitive activities, the standard for obtaining preliminary injunctive relief remains high.  It is important for parties seeking injunctive relief to be able to provide the court with specific, admissible evidence of unfair competitive activities.  Generalized allegations normally will be insufficient to allow the court to grant relief. Take for example a recent case involving the purchaser of a company’s assets who sought to enforce a noncompete against one of the company’s former employees.

In that case, Geovesi Holdings, Ltd. purchased certain assets of Earthwater Global, LLC as part of a court-ordered liquidation. The purchased assets include “all employment, non-disclosure agreements and  confidentiality agreements entered into by [EW Global].”  Following the sale, Geovesi filed suit in Chancery Court against one of EW Global’s former employees, Robert Bisson, to enforce noncompete and non-solicitation covenants in his employment agreement.  There also was pending litigation between Bisson and Geovesi in Virginia and an arbitration proceeding.

As evidence of Bisson’s competitive activities, Geovesi relied exclusively on allegations in Bisson’s Virginia pleadings that he competed with Geovesi.  The Court noted that while these generalized allegations are admissible evidence of competition, they did not provide a sufficient evidentiary foundation to support injunctive relief.

While we are all familiar with the use of preliminary injunctions in aid of litigation, they also have a place in alternative dispute resolution. In Chartis Warranty Guard, Inc. v. National Electronics Warranty, LLC, the Delaware Court of Chancery issued a preliminary injunction pending the outcome of contractually mandated arbitration. The inclusion of a clause allowing issuance of a preliminary injunction prior to binding arbitration is a wise move if a contract includes non-competition or confidentiality provisions, the violation of which would lead to irreparable harm.

In Chartis Warranty, the plaintiff was a joint venture formed between the defendant, National Electronics Warranty, LLC (“NEW”) and Chartis Insurance. The purpose of the joint venture was to provide retailers with consumer warranty programs. Pursuant to the contracts governing the parties’ responsibilities, NEW received a designated fee for administering the retailer warrant programs, and Chartis received all profits earned above the fee owed to NEW.

In the course of its administration, NEW gathered a variety of data relating to the consumer warranty programs. Some of this information was publicly available, and some was sensitive. Among the move sensitive information was loss ratios, profitability, and earnings curves, which would be valuable to Chartis’s competitors. In the process of reorganizing certain programs, NEW provided this sensitive information to some of plaintiff’s competitors, leading to a dispute about whether the data was subject to various confidentiality provisions contained in the contracts governing the parties’ relationship. NEW maintained that it owned the data, and was permitted to disclose it-Chartis disagreed, asserting that it maintained exclusive ownership over the relevant information.

I n today’s technology driven workplace, departing employees often leave with more than a few notepads and office supplies. Most companies have a wealth of information available by electronic means that proves to be too tempting for some who have designs to unfairly compete

youngconawaywith their former employer.

The latest trend among noncompete law practitioners has been the assertion of various computer theft statutes to reign in this activity. On the federal level, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1030 et seq. (CFAA), is being brought with more frequency in noncompetition enforcement and trade secret cases. The statute requires a showing of intentional access to a protected computer without authorization or beyond authorization that results in damages. It also provides for attorneys’ fees if the plaintiff is successful in proving its case.

scales.jpgThe Court of Chancery is often hesitant to enforce a covenant that would preclude an individual from earning a living. Where a restriction on the ability to be gainfully employed is involved, the customary sensitivity of the Court to the particular interest affected by its remedies is heightened. As a result, parties seeking to enforce covenants not to compete must use caution so as not to request relief that would essentially render the defendant unable to work.

In balancing the equities, the Chancery Court will analyze whether the consequences of enforcement to the employee are grave and/or whether the interests of the employer are “slight or ephemeral.” Disproportionate hardship is often a reason for refusing equitable remedies. If the equities balance in the employee’s favor, even a well-drafted covenant may not be enforced.

When determining the balance of hardships, only actual harm is relevant to this determination. Actual harm normally requires there to be specific economic harm. A technical violation of a noncompete that causes no cognizable injury may leave the plaintiff without equitable relief.

The amount of actual harm is also considered. The pilfering of one or two customers may not be enough while evidence of wide spread solicitation will normally prompt action from the Court. The Court may examine whether there is evidence that the former employee is using the employer’s customer lists or other proprietary information before granting injunctive relief.

Other considerations include the level and sophistication of the former employee. The Court of Chancery has noted that the more skilled, the higher positioned the former employee, the greater the harm that would inure to the employer if the covenant were not enforced.
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