Chancery Court Decision Provides Insight Into Drafting Enforceable Forum Selection Clauses

The Delaware Court of Chancery is nationally respected for its consistent and conscientious decisions in cases involving complex business issues. As a result, many legal practitioners recommend that contracting parties include a forum selection clause requiring that any disputes arising from a given contract be heard by a court of competent jurisdiction in the State of Delaware, including the Court of Chancery. A recent case in the Delaware Court of Chancery provides insight into the effective enforcement of a forum-selection clause.youngconaway

In the daintily-named case of ASDC Holdings, LLC v. The Richard J. Malouf 2008 All Smiles Grantor Retained Annuity Trust, two parties entered into an agreement regarding the sale of equity in a Texas business. The agreement contained both an arbitration and a Delaware forum-selection clause which provided that any actions “with respect to any claim or cause of action arising under or relating to this Agreement” must be brought in a Delaware state or federal court with jurisdiction.

After the deal was executed, both parties became unhappy and sought legal relief: Plaintiff initiated an arbitration proceeding, and Defendant brought suit in a Texas court. Plaintiff thereafter filed papers in the Delaware Court of Chancery, seeking a preliminary injunction to prohibit the Texas action from moving forward in violation of the forum-selection clause.

The first question before the Court was whether it had jurisdiction to grant a preliminary injunction. The Court of Chancery is a court of limited jurisdiction-it does not have jurisdiction where there is an adequate remedy at law for the damages alleged. Defendant asserted that Plaintiff had an adequate remedy at law because it could assert the forum selection clause as an affirmative defense in the Texas action. Rejecting this argument, the Court held that where the underlying forum-selection clause is valid and broad enough to arguably reach the underlying claims, litigating the applicability of the forum-selection clause in another state deprives the parties of the benefit bargained for and does not constitute an adequate remedy at law.

Having established that it had jurisdiction, the Court moved on to address the Plaintiffs’ Motion for Preliminary Injunction. In order to obtain a Preliminary Injunction, the moving party must show (1) a reasonable probability of success on the merits, (2) an imminent threat of irreparable injury, and (3) that the balance of the equities favors the issuance of the requested relief. Defendant raised several arguments as to Plaintiff’s probability of success. First, it argued that several defendants in the Texas action are not signatories of the contract at issue, and therefore may not invoke the forum selection clause. The Court noted that, as wholly-owned subsidiaries, officers, and directors of the contract signatory, the third-party defendants are closely related to the signatories and may invoke the clause. Regarding the remainder of Defendant’s contentions, the Court concluded that the forum-selection clause was broad enough to give rise to a colorable argument that all of the claims raised in the Texas action fall within the scope of the clause.

As to the second element of Plaintiff’s claim, the Court held that proceeding on a claim in an unwarranted forum constitutes irreparable harm. Finally, the Court concluded that the balance of the equities favored Plaintiff, although the Court did not elaborate.

The Court’s opinion raised two key points to drafting a forum selection clause that may be successfully enforced through a Motion for Preliminary Injunction. First, the forum selection clause at issue must be valid. This means that the clause must permit claims to be brought in the appropriate Delaware Court.  A clause requiring that any claim be brought in the Court of Chancery, regardless of whether the Court has subject matter jurisdiction, may not be enforceable.

Second, the clause should be drafted as broadly as possible, to ensure that any claims raised in a foreign jurisdiction will be governed by the clause, and subject to dismissal under the forum-selection clause. If the causes of action are not arguably within the ambit of the forum-selection clause, the party seeking to enforce it may not be entitled to a preliminary injunction. The language used by the parties in this case-governing “any claim or cause of action arising under or relating to this Agreement”-was found to be sufficiently broad enough to cover the claims at issue.

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